Mindfulness

Take a moment for mindfulness this fall and enter to win our sweepstakes for five books that focus on mindfulness!

A Fox Found a Box

A Fox Found a Box By Ged Adamson

A little fox is digging for food when–OUCH! What is that?–the fox finds a box! When the fox brings the box home to his animal friends–and turns a funny-looking knob–the box starts to sing, and music fills the forest. Everyone agrees that it feels nice. Day and night, they listen to the box’s songs, until, one day, it goes quiet. No matter what they try, they just can’t get the box to sing again. The animals stop swishing their tails and flapping their wings…. But, in the silence, the fox hears the drip-drop rhythm of melting icicles and the thump thump of a beaver’s tail and comes to realize music is everywhere. The noises of the forest and the animals build into a symphony, until, eventually, everyone joins together in a joyous dance party.

Deep Breaths

Deep Breaths By Carol Thompson

Dolly the pig and Jack the rabbit are best friends, but even best friends don’t always get along. When Dolly and Jack get into a big disagreement, they go from happy to mad, to sad…and then back to happy!

Both hilarious and instructive, Deep Breaths is a refreshing picture-book portrait of real friendship, and sets an example of how to manage strong emotions and resolve differences through simple mindfulness and meditation techniques.

No Biggy!

No Biggy! By Elycia Rubin; illustrated by Josh Talbot

Getting frustrated is a part of life! And, whether Kiki is working on squeezing toothpaste right onto her toothbrush, getting the zipper to slide all the way up her jacket, or spreading cream cheese on a bagel, she learns to take a deep breath, say “No Biggy!,” and try again—after all, things don’t always go exactly as expected on the first try!

Kiki even teaches her mom and dad a thing or two—yes, grown-ups get frustrated, too! Bright and encouraging illustrations picture Kiki throughout her day, right up to her big bedtime bubble bath. Filled with love and positivity, No Biggy! is certain to become the go-to, favorite saying in your home.

This Makes Me Jealous

This Makes Me Jealous By Courtney Carbone; illustrated by Hilli Kushnir

In This Makes Me Jealous, a young girl is proud of being the star athlete at her school. But when a new kid moves to town and she suddenly has to share the spotlight, jealousy gets the best of her. After a tough soccer matchup, the girl’s gym teacher helps her to empathize with the new student and give her a chance. Soon, the girl learns that making new friends and being inclusive are more important than being the best.

The Dealing with Feelings series of early readers is designed to give voice to what’s brewing inside. Through short, simple text and repetitive observational phrases, children will learn to name their emotions as they learn to read.

This Makes Me Scared

This Makes Me Scared By Courtney Carbone; illustrated by Hilli Kushnir

In This Makes Me Scared, a young boy is terrified about taking swim lessons. The water is cold, chlorine burns his eyes, and worst of all, everyone is watching him. He’s scared that he’ll never learn to swim–or drown trying! When his instructor shows him how to calm his mind, the boy decides to face his fear and open himself up to a fun, new experience.

The Dealing with Feelings series of early readers is designed to give voice to what’s brewing inside. Through short, simple text and repetitive observational phrases, children will learn to name their emotions as they learn to read.

When Sadness is at Your Door

When Sadness is at Your Door By Eva Eland

Sadness can be scary and confusing at any age! When we feel sad, especially for long periods of time, it can seem as if the sadness is a part of who we are–an overwhelming, invisible, and scary sensation.

In When Sadness Is at Your Door, Eva Eland brilliantly approaches this feeling as if it is a visitor. She gives it a shape and a face, and encourages the reader to give it a name, all of which helps to demystify it and distinguish it from ourselves. She suggests activities to do with it, like sitting quietly, drawing, and going outside for a walk. The beauty of this approach is in the respect the book has for the feeling, and the absence of a narrative that encourages the reader to “get over” it or indicates that it’s “bad,” both of which are anxiety-producing notions.

Simple illustrations that recall the classic style of Crockett Johnson (Harold and the Purple Crayon) invite readers to add their own impressions.

Eva Eland’s debut picture book is a great primer in mindfulness and emotional literacy, perfect for kids navigating these new feelings–and for adult readers tackling the feelings themselves!