Anti-Boredom Month

Most children and young adults look forward to summer vacation, but many express boredom two weeks after school is out. Perhaps this is why July is “Anti-Boredom Month.” No one should be bored when they can enroll in a summer reading program at their local library, but some children don’t have transportation or caregivers who can get them to the library. In these cases it’s important that the library come to them. Some libraries do this by offering summer reading programs through book mobile services. It may also be done through organizations that provide summer care for children. For example, the Girls and Boys Clubs programs may be a natural partnership. Even Title I programs in schools may not offer a full range of library services and would welcome the public library involvement in serving this population. It’s common for libraries to have summer reading themes, but the program will bring in more readers if there are activities beyond a focus on the numbers of books read. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Introduce a new genre each week. Include activities that call upon readers’ imaginations: (1) Write a rap that conveys the plot of a book (2) Write teasers to introduce a book to other readers (3) Produce a video to entice others to read the book. A sampling of titles from Random House include:

Adventure

The Ballad of Wilbur and the Moose by John Stadler (picture book)

Boys of Blur by N.D. Wilson (middle grade)

The Living by Matt De La Peña (young adult)

Mystery

The Nate the Great series by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat & illus. by Marc Simont (early reader)

The Mister Max series by Cynthia Voigt & illus. by Iacopo Bruno (middle grade)

The Sammy Keyes series by Wendelin Van Draanen (middle grade)

Mojo by Tim Tharp (young adult)

Fantasy

Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss (picture book)

Ophelia and the Marvelous Boy by Karen Foxlee (middle grade)

Wise Acres: The Seventh Circle of Heck by Dale E. Basye & illus. by Bob Dob (middle grade)

Spoils by Tammar Stain (young adult)

Science Fiction

The Three Little Aliens and the Big Red Robot by Margaret McNamara & illus. by Mark Fearing (picture book)

The Winter of the Robots by Kurtis Scaletta (middle grade)

Indigo by Gina Linko (young adult)

Touched by Cyn Balong (young adult)

Historical Fiction

Born and Bred in the Great Depression by Jonah Winter & illus. by Kimberly Buicken Root (picture book)

The Mighty Miss Malone by Christopher Paul Curtis (middle grade)

Nory Ryan’s Song by Patricia Reilly Giff (middle grade)

Under the Blood-Red Sun by Graham Salisbury (middle grade)

Hattie Big Sky by Kirby Larson (middle grade)

Hattie Ever After by Kirby Larson (young adult)

Woods Runner by Gary Paulsen (young adult)

Humor

How to Babysit a Grandma by Jean Reagan & illus. by Lee Wildish (picture book)

Poor Doreen: A Fishy Tale by Sally Lloyd-Jones & illus. by Alexandra Boiger (picture book)

The Cheesie Mack series by Steve Cotler (middle grade)

Middle School Cool by Malya Williams (middle grade)

Turtle in Paradise by Jennifer Holm (middle grade)

The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin by Josh Berk (young adult)

Real Live Boyfriends by E. Lockhart (young adult)

Will by Maria Boyd (young adult)

Nonfiction

In New York by Marc Brown (picture book)

The Daring Nellie Bly by Bonnie Christensen (young adult)

Cause by Tonya Bolden (middle grade-young adult)

A Passion for Victory by Benson Bobrick (middle grade-young adult)

Enrique’s Journey by Sonia Nazario (young adult)

  • Older readers may enjoy creating a webpage where readers can share a favorite book. Encourage them to help younger readers with posts. Readers using book mobile services may post when the book mobile comes to their neighborhood.
  • Sponsor a writing contest that grows out of a favorite novel. Ask readers to write an essay called “Name of a character Is Not Bored.” (e.g. “Harriet Welsch Is Not Bored,” or “Woohoo Cray Is Not Bored”)
  • Finally, have readers plan a musical production called “Anti-Boredom Reads” that includes a sampling of books read during the month of July. Each reader should be included in the production. They should pick a favorite book to present. They should design and create appropriate props and scenery. Younger readers may need to work as a group. Have readers make invitations for their family members and posters advertising the program. This type of activity is easily accomplished in childcare facilities outside the public library. Teens might coordinate this activity. Many need volunteer hours for school, and this is a perfect opportunity for them.