Celebrate the earth!

Earth Day is Sunday, April 22. Use these picture books in your classroom or library to teach your youngest readers how to love and appreciate the earth.

A Hippy-Hoppy Toad

A Hippy-Hoppy Toad By Peggy Archer; illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf

It’s hard to be a tiny toad minding your own business on a twig. First a bird pecks at him. . . . Then a bee buzzes. . . . Then a dog barks . . . and so on. And each time the toad is surprised by a buzz or a woof (or the toe of a sneaker!), he hops to a new location farther down the road. With fun sounds, clever rhymes, and an irresistible rhythm, this is the perfect story for sharing one-on-one or in a group.

Poppy, Buttercup, Bluebell, and Dandy

Poppy, Buttercup, Bluebell, and Dandy By Fiona Woodcock

Watch a gorgeous garden bloom and grow in this enchanting new picture book from rising star Fiona Woodcock!

A group of beautiful and feisty young wildflowers on skateboards and scooters zoom through the pages of this stunning book, spreading flower seeds as they go. Together they transform their urban environment into a place that is no longer gray, but filled with color and scent. Nature’s magic is revealed in all its glory, embodying Ralph Waldo Emerson’s idea that a weed is “a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.” Budding environmentalists will respond to the underlying themes of conservation and stewardship of the earth.

The Forever Tree

The Forever Tree By Donna Lukas & Tereasa Surratt

A fresh twist on Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree based on a real tree in Wisconsin that became something more, this is a timeless story about loss and renewal at home and in nature.

The animals and humans always knew their tree was special. The trunk was the best place to host championship bingo tournaments, and the branches were perfect for swinging in the shade! But when the tree gets sick, neighbors new and old will have to join forces if they have any chance of saving their treetop home.

A touching tale based on the true story of one special tree, and the community that brought it back to life.

Kate, Who Tamed The Wind

Kate, Who Tamed The Wind By Liz Garton Scanlon; illustrated by Lee White

Award-winning author Liz Garton Scanlon presents a young, rhythmic read-aloud about a girl who solves a windy problem with an environmentally sound solution: planting trees.

A wild blows on the tippy-top of a steep hill, turning everything upside down for the man who lives there. Luckily, Kate comes up with a plan to tame the wind. With an old wheelbarrow full of young trees, she journeys up the steep hill to add a little green to the man’s life, and to protect the house from the howling wind. From award-winning author Liz Garton Scanlon and whimsical illustrator Lee White comes a delightfully simple, lyrical story about the important role trees play in our lives, and caring for the world in which we live.

Moon: A Peek-Through Picture Book

Moon: A Peek-Through Picture Book By Written and illustrated by Britta Teckentrup

Next in the much-loved children’s series that began with Tree: A Peek-Through Picture Book is an elaborate book with peek-through holes that show the moon’s different phases with each turn of the page.

Over deserts and forests, Arctic tundra and tropical beaches, the moon shines down on creatures around the world. Children will love discovering how it changes from night to night as the lunar cycle is shown through clever peek-through holes, each revealing the moon in a different size and shape.

Emma and the Whale

Emma and the Whale By Julie Case; illustrated by Lee White

In this lyrical picture book with conservation themes, a girl helps rescue a whale who has washed ashore. Here is a beautifully written, moving story that will appeal to all animal lovers, and to those interested in protecting our oceans and marine life.

Emma lives in a crooked house in an old whaling town and often takes her dog, Nemo, to the beach. On their walks, they find amazing treasures. But one day, they find something completely unexpected: a baby whale, washed ashore. Emma empathizes with the animal’s suffering, but can she set her free?